Weekly Programme

Week 1. 13 September 2016: Introduction

Lecture location: EYCKHOF 3/005

Lecture topics

  • Introduction to the course and its subject
  • Introduction to HTML
  • Slides

Seminar activities

Further reading

  • Willard McCarty, Humanities computing (Basingstoke; New York: Palgrave Macmillan 2005).
  • Michael Polanyi, The Tacit Dimension (University of Chicago Press, 2009)
  • Stephen Ramsay, Learning to Program
  • John Unsworth, ‘What is Humanities Computing and What is Not?’, in: Melissa Terras, Julianne Nyhan, & Edward Vanhoutte (eds.), Defining Digital Humanities: a Reader, 2013, pp. 36–37
  • Many HTML beginners courses and ‘cheat sheets’, for instance those available via HTMLDog.com, WebMonkey.com,  HTML.net, or W3Schools.com
  • Adriaan van der Weel, ‘New mediums: New perspectives on knowledge production’, in Text comparison and digital creativity: The production of presence and meaning in digital text scholarship, ed. Wido van Peursen, Ernst D. Thoutenhoofd and Adriaan van der Weel, Leiden: Brill, 2010, pp. 253-68
  • Adriaan van der Weel, Changing Our Textual Minds: Towards a Digital Order of Knowledge [COTM], (Manchester University Press, 2011), chapter 5, “Salient features of digital textuality” (pp. 142-193)

 

Week 2. 20 September 2016: XML 1

Lecture location: LIPSIUS 307

Homework (upload 18 September)

Preparatory reading

Lecture topics

  • Introduction to text encoding 
  • Slides

Seminar activities

Further reading

 

Week 3. 27 September 2016: No class

12:00h  Lecture Susan Schreibmann: ‘Digital Humanities, Social Engagement, and the Archive’ (Conference Room, Johan Huizinga Building)

13:45h  PhD defense Peter Verhaar: Quantitative Hermeneutics: Affordances and Limitations of Algorithmic Criticism (Academy Building, Rapenburg)

Students are invited to attend both the guest lecture and the PhD defense ceremony.

  • Please scrutinize your online CV, keeping in mind that the BDMS Staff will visit these pages to get to know you. Make sure to correct typos and other details!

 

Week 4. 4 October: XML 2

Lecture location: LIPSIUS 307

Homework (upload 2 October)

  • Finish XML-exercises. Upload XML-files for questions 6 and 7 to your own personal folder on the server.
  • Transcribe the letter you have been assigned as well as you can, using ASCII text only (no Word processor). Indicate any unintelligible text. Upload to your folder on the server as HTML or TXT file. 

Preparatory reading

Lecture topics

Seminar activities

  • Slides
  • Discussion of homework exercises and transcription
  • Creating a TEI P5 file on the basis of a template (download here)
  • Encoding the basic textual features of the assigned letter from the Bohn archive sample text
  • Discussion of the Guidelines for the Transcription and Encoding of Primary Sources as defined for the Booktrade Correspondence Project [BCP Guidelines]

Further reading

  • TEI P5 Guidelines online
  • Allen H. Renear, ‘Text Encoding’ in: Susan Schreibmann, Ray Siemens & John Unsworth (eds.), A Companion to Digital Humanities (Malden/London: Blackwell, 2004), pp. 218-239.

 

Week 5. 11 October 2016: XML 3

Lecture location: LIPSIUS 307

Homework (upload 9 October)

  • Create a TEI-XML file based on your letter. Leave the <teiHeader> for now, encode in the <text> what you can according to the BCP Guidelines. Upload to the server.
  • If you can identify any peculiarities in your letter that are not dealt with in the BCP Guidelines, please indicate them in an e-mail to the staff.

Reading and preparation

Lecture topics

  • The TEI header
  • Metadata
  • Slides

Seminar activities

Further reading

  • TEI Guidelines, section 2: The TEI Header
  • Elli Mylonas & Allen Renear, ‘The Text Encoding Initiative at 10: Not Just an Interchange Format Anymore – But a New Research Community’, Computers and the Humanities 33.1 (April 1999), pp. 1-9. DOI: 10.1023/A:1001832310939.

 

Week 6. 18 October 2016: XSLT 1

Lecture location: LIPSIUS 307

No homework (work on Assignment 1)

Preparatory reading

Lecture topics

  • XML and Presentation
  • An introduction to XSLT
  • Slides

Seminar activities

Further reading

  • Gerard Genette & Marie Maclean, “Introduction to the Paratext”, in: New Literary History, 22:2 (2010), pp. 261–272.
  • Don MacKenzie, Bibliography and the Sociology of Texts, (Cambridge [etc.]: Cambridge University Press 1999).
  • Steven J. DeRose et al., “What Is Text, Really?”, in: Journal of Computing in Higher Education, 1:2 (1990), pp. 2–26.

Week 7. 25 October 2016: No class – Study week

Note that the deadline of Assignment 1 – XML has been postponed to 28 October. Please Send in by e-mail. Also note the important correction to the TEI Header, as specified on 11 October! 

Week 8. 1 November 2016: XSLT 2

Lecture Location: Vrieshof 4 / 008A

Homework (upload 30 October)

Preparatory reading

Lecture topics

  • XSLT: Iterations
  • Path
  • Slides

Seminar

 Further reading 

  • Ann Blair, Too Much to Know, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010)
  • Willard McCarty, Modeling: A Study in Words and Meanings, in: A Companion to Digital Humanities, ed. Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, John Unsworth, (Oxford: Blackwell, 2004).

 

Week 9. 8 November 2016: XSLT 3

Lecture Location: Vrieshof 4 / 008A

Homework (upload 6 November)

  • XSLT Seminar Exercises: 5.2, 6, and 7.1. Please upload the stylesheets, not the results (XSLT-files, not HTML) to your folder on the server.

Preparatory reading

  • The full XSLT Course [=sections 1-11, appendices A+B; course exercises at your leisure]

Lecture topics

  • XSLT as a programming language
  • Concepts in knowledge representation and in artifical intelligence
  • Slides

Seminar activities

Further reading 

Week 10. 15 November 2016: XSLT 4

Lecture Location: Vrieshof 4 / 008A

Homework (upload 13 November)

Preparatory reading

Lecture topics

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Slides

Seminar

Note that for this seminar, we will combine the two groups into one long session, from 1-5pm. We’ll form groups, assign mini-research projects, which you work on during the seminar, and then present in class. 

Further reading

  • Turing, Alan. “Computing Machinery and Intelligence.” The New Media Reader. Ed. Noah Wardrip-Fruin and Nick Montfort. Cambridge Mass.: The MIT Press, 2003.
  • Damper, Robert I. “The Logic of Searle’s Chinese Room Argument.” Minds and Machines 16.2 (2006): pp. 163–183.
  • Lahti, L., Ilomäki, N. & Tolonen, M. “A Quantitative Study of History in the English Short-Title Catalogue (ESTC), 1470-1800”. LIBER Quarterly. 25.2 (2015): pp. 87–116. <http://doi.org/10.18352/lq.10112>

 

Week 11. 22 November 2016: Databases 1

Lecture Location: Vrieshof 4 / 008A

Preparatory reading

  • Stephen Ramsay, ‘Databases‘, in A Companion to Digital Humanities (Oxford: Blackwell, 2014), Susan Schreibmann, Ray Siemens & John Unsworth (eds.), chapter 15

Lecture topics

  • Introduction to relational database theory
  • Slides

Seminar

Further reading

 >> Final submission date Assignment 2 – XSLT: 25 November. Send in by e-mail.

Week 12. 29 November 2016: Databases 2

Lecture Location: Lipsius 227

Homework (upload 27 November)

  • Databases and SQL Exercises 3 and 4. Create at least one database in Access and upload the Relationship Report. You may upload the ERD of the other in PDF, PPT, JPG, or any other file format that suits you.

Preparatory reading

Lecture topics

Seminar

 

Week 13. 6 December 2016: Databases 3

Lecture Location: Lipsius 227

Homework (upload 4 December)

  • Database and SQL Exercises, 5(a-p) and 6 a-d. Simply write your SQL queries in a text file (.txt) and upload this to the Bookandbyte-server.

Preparatory reading 

Lecture topics

  • Datases and Visualisation
  • Linked open data
  • Slides

Seminar activities

Further reading

 

Week 14. 13 December 2016: Databases 4
 & course wrap-up

Lecture Location: De Vrieshof 4 / 008A

Homework (upload 11 December)

  • SQL exercises (numbers tba). Simply write your SQL queries and comments on the results in a text file (.txt) and upload this to the Bookandbyte-server.

Preparatory reading

Lecture topics

  • This week, we will invite two BDMS alumni to present on their current work, in which they frequently use DMT-related technologies

Seminar activities

For this seminar, we will combine the two groups into one long session, from 1-5pm. The different teams will all be assigned small research projects. The results of these studies will be presented during the final hour of the seminar. 

 

>> Final submission date Assignment 3 – SQL : 24 December 2016. Send in via gmail.

>> Final submission date Take Home Exam: 24 January 2017. Send in via gmail.